The age-old privilege issue of an in-house lawyer providing business or legal advice has once again reared its head. Marriott’s legal department provided analysis and advice into the company’s strategic-plan memorandum, but a federal court ruled that the privilege did not protect the lawyer-drafted sections from discovery. RCHFU, LLC v. Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corp., 2018 WL 3055774 (D. Colo. May 23, 2018). You may read the decision here.

This case raises issues of legal standards and practical application, so let’s explore it.

Strategic Plan Memorandum

Marriott Vacation Club’s COO and its Senior VP sent a memorandum, titled “Ritz-Carlton Destination Club Proposed Strategic Plan,” to the Corporate Growth Committee. On the surface, this document seems purely business related with no privilege protection. While its confidentiality remained intact, the memo contains no privilege-related notices or alerts, and no lawyer appears to have written or received it.

But let’s take a closer look.

Business Advice or Legal Advice?

Marriott’s Vice-President and Senior Counsel submitted a sworn declaration, available here, stating that Keep Reading this POP Post