Tips for Preventing or Limiting In-House Counsel Depositions 2

Deposing in-house lawyers was once considered taboo, but has now become a litigation trend.  And these depositions are not limited to an in-house corporate lawyer in business litigation over a deal gone bad; trial lawyers increasingly seek to depose in-house litigation managers as well.  When these deposition requests arise, lawyers should appropriately consider the significant attorney-client privilege issues that will inevitably become center stage.

Several questions arise in this situation.Business man pledging  Is there anything in-house and outside counsel can do to prevent the deposition from occurring?  How should counsel handle the privilege-related issues if the deposition goes forward? How can in-house counsel avoid becoming a deposition target in the first place?

Federal and state courts provide divergent views on the subject.  Some follow the so-called Shelton rule, originating in Shelton v. American Motors Co., 805 F.2d 1323 (8th Cir. 1986), which permits a protective order preventing in-house counsel depositions unless the party seeking the deposition shows (1) that no other means exist to obtain the information; (2) the information sought is relevant and non-privileged; and (3)  the information is crucial to the party’s case preparation.

Many courts, notably the Second Circuit, decline to follow Shelton and prefer to review all relevant facts and circumstances before deciding whether to permit a deposition, such as the deposition need, the lawyer’s role in the matter on which discovery is sought, and the risk of encountering privilege and work-product issues. In re Subpoena Issued to Dennis Friedman, 350 F.3d 65 (2d Cir. 2003).

In my recent article, Preventing or Limiting In-House Depositions, published by Inside Counsel, I explore the still-developing law on this important issue.  I also provide tips on how in-house counsel can lessen their chances of becoming a deposition target, how to address the privilege-related issues, and whether the in-house lawyer needs separate counsel.

You may access the article at this link.   My thanks to Inside Counsel for publishing the article and allowing access through this post.